Snoop Dogg, 2 Chainz, Rick Ross & More Rappers Become Fixtures on the Food Scene

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Courtesy of VH1
Snoop Dogg and Martha Stewart on Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party.

Snoop Dogg, 2 Chainz, Rick Ross & More Rappers Become Fixtures on the Food Scene

Snoop Dogg furiously stirred flour into a creamy bechamel sauce, a whisk in one hand and a microphone in the other during a cooking demonstration with chef Guy Fieri.

He tossed herbs into the mac and cheese and spicy wing dishes with the dramatic flair of Emeril Lagasse, raising his hands in the air, spinning around after taste tests and occasionally singing lines from songs like “Drop It Like It’s Hot” as a crowd cheered wildly.

Wearing black shades, his dreads in a ponytail, the pioneering rapper rushed off the cooking stage and emerged 20 minutes later at a nearby beachside DJ booth, also part of the recent South Beach Wine & Food Festival, spinning tunes, including many of his own, while a stagehand passed out joints to the sweaty, enthusiastic crowd.

Snoop may seem an unlikely guest for a festival where high-brow foodies come for $500-a-plate dinners to mingle with chefs like Jose Andres and Daniel Boulud, but it’s emblematic of the widening intersection between food and music that Snoop and other rappers and hip-hop stars are capitalizing on, where unlikely pairings form shows like VH1’s Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party and rappers like 2 Chainz drop cookbooks along with their albums. Mobb Deep rapper Prodigy, who served time in prison, recently came out with the cookbook commissary kitchen: my infamous prison cookbook, which includes a recipe that mixes Ramen noodles and Doritos. You can even buy Rap Snacks, honey jalapeno potato chips with Fetty Wap’s face on the bag.

On a recent episode of Snoop and Martha Stewart’s VH1 show, she roasted a whole pig, proclaiming the new way to eat pork was “nose to tail.”

“Nah, nah, nah. In the ‘hood we say from the rooter to the tooter,” says Snoop, who helped Stewart make a Cuban mojito, busting out a quippy rhyme before toasting the audience.

Earlier this month, Miami rapper Rick Ross tapped Stewart to announce the debut of his new album on Twitter. The queen of homemaking also included a photo of her holding a cake with Ross’ album cover on top.

Rev Run of the rap group Run-DMC has also become a fixture on the food scene with the Cooking Channel’s Rev Run’s Sunday Suppers. The father of six told The Associated Press that cooking is more about family time and less about the creative process for him.

“Music, like food, has no language barriers. When people hear music or eat tasty food, all of a sudden we have something in common,” he said.

Marketing experts say Stewart and the Food Network, which sponsors the South Beach festival, are using the partnerships to stay fresh and relevant.

“Some of the folks in the food industry are trying to appeal to a younger audience and associate their brands with that,” said Darren Seifer, food and beverage industry analyst for the NPD Group.

But it’s not all about inking new business deals. Some artists were busy in the kitchen long before they started making music.

Rapper Flavor Flav grew up cooking in his family’s soul food diner. Before bursting onto the music scene with the group Public Enemy, he went to cooking school and says he once was the head chef at the Nassau County Courthouse in New York.

“It’s like music — you’re always creating different tastes, different flavors,” he said in a phone interview.

He’s had several restaurants, mostly centered on his fried chicken, that have closed due to “poor management,” he said. Rockhouse Las Vegas is currently featuring his grub and he said he hopes to open another restaurant.

Snoop Dogg & Martha Stewart’s Dinner Party Tips (Yes, Weed Included)
Rapper 2 Chainz, whose hits include “Champions,” dropped a cookbook with one of his albums, featuring recipes for beer-steamed snow crab legs and herb-crusted lamb chops. But he’s struggled in the food business after the Department of Health recently gave his Atlanta tapas restaurant a dismal inspection.

Action Bronson often rhymes in culinary speak. The rapper, whose first album included tracks titled “Jerk Chicken,” ”Shiraz” and “Brunch,” went to culinary school for a year before dropping out and pursuing music.

In an episode of his profanely titled Viceland show, he prepares chicken cutlets with a sesame panko crust that he serves with Mexican chocolate sauce, ice cream, flambeed Hennessey bananas and torched marshmallows, calling it “a fat guy sandwich.”

R&B singer Kelis, whose music intersected with hip-hop and is perhaps best known for “Milkshake,” went to Le Cordon Bleu after hitting the charts, leading to a cookbook, a pop-up restaurant in London and an album titled Food, with songs like “Jerk Ribs,” ”Cobbler” and “Biscuits n’ Gravy.”

“I love working with my hands and getting to create something,” said the singer, who is planning to open a restaurant in Los Angeles later this year. “It’s very different than music … you can’t really control what you hear. They have to hear it, whereas food is a choice.”

 

 

Jessica Sanchez, A Rising Star, Releases hot, new single, “Call Me”

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Photo courtesy of lockerdome.com

Jessica Elizabeth Sanchez (born August 4, 1995) is an American singer and songwriter originally from Chula Vista, California. She was the runner-up on the eleventh season of the reality show American Idol. Prior to appearing on American Idol, Jessica competed in the first season of America’s Got Talent at the age of 11.
Jessica Elizabeth Sanchez was born in Chula Vista, California on August 4, 1995 to parents, Edita (born Bugay) and Gilbert Sanchez.[7] She was raised in Eastlake, Chula Vista along with two younger brothers. Her father is a Mexican-American originally from Texas, and is an Aviation Ordnance First Class Petty Officer in the United States Navy Reserves. Her mother is a Filipina whose family is from Samal, Bataan in the Philippines.

She attended Eastlake Middle School in Chula Vista and was homeschooled all four years of high school.

She started singing at the age of 2, and aspires to be a mainstream singer who can “belt but sing upbeat songs”. Eminem and Beyoncé are her favorite male and female artists, while Jennifer Hudson is her favorite American Idol contestant. Other musical influences include Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, Celine Dion, Etta James,Christina Aguilera, and Michael Jackson.

In early 2016 Sanchez began collaborating with YouTube singing sensation Leroy Sanchez. The pair released covers of Beyonce’s “1+1” and Justin Bieber ft. Halsey’s “The Feeling”. The colaborations has received over one million respective views. On April 7, Sanchez returned with numerous other idol alumni to perform on the penultimate and Grand Finale episode for the fifteenth (farewell) season of American Idol. Sanchez performed her season 11 revival of Andrea Bocelli’s “The Prayer”. Her performance was claimed as the ‘best performance’ and ‘stand out’ of the night gaining her international praise once again. Consequently Sanchez’s 2011 recording of the song re-entered the iTunes Top 200 singles chart peaking at number 166. Sanchez is set to travel to Australia and New Zealand for a total of four shows in May for her first Australian and New Zealand tour. Sanchez has also revealed she is currently in the process of recording her second studio album with the release date to still be decided. She described her second album to be more ‘gritty’ and ‘soulful’ compared to her debut album.

Her hot new single release, “Call Me”, is available for download on CD Baby and ITunes.

courtesy of wikipedia

Spotify Slammed With $150 Million Lawsuit For Unpaid Royalties

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The complaint says the streaming service “publicly” admitted its failure to obtain licenses for the songs.

Musician David Lowery is suing music-streaming site Spotify for illegally distributing several of his copyrighted songs. Lowery, the frontman for the bands Cracker and Camper van Beethoven, is seeking a minimum of $150 million in damages.

According to the complaint brought by Lowery, Spotify has illegally streamed copyrighted music for over 75 million users and failed to locate the owners of those compositions for payment.

Lowery is representing a group of over 100 other members who are also reportedly frustrated with the streaming service, making this a class action lawsuit. The lawsuit was filed on Dec. 28 at the Central District Court of California.

Lowery’s complaint states Spotify has “publicly” admitted its failure to obtain licenses and created a reserve fund of somewhere between $17 million and $25 million for royalty payments which have been “wrongfully withheld from artists.”

Distributing content without the proper licensing, the complaint says, “creates substantial harm and injury to the copyright holders, and diminishes the integrity of the works.”

Lowery is seeking damages for the unlawful distribution of his songs “Almond Grove,” “Get On Down the Road,” “King of Bakersfield” and “Tonight I Cross the Border.” Statutory penalties for this case include judgments between $750 and $30,000 for each infringed work and up to $150,000 per song for willful infringement.

Spotify is currently embroiled in settlement negotiations with the National Music Publishers Association for allowing users to access music that has not been properly licensed and without paying artists their royalties. Last week, in a blog poston Spotify’s site, the company admitted to having an issue paying musicians “fairly, rapidly, and transparently.”

The streaming service has also had similar cases brought against it in the past by record labels the Ministry of Sound and Victory Records.

Article courtesy of Nadya AgrawalEditorial Fellow, The Huffington Post
12/29/2015 04:15 pm ET