Beyond Country: All The Genres #Beyoncé Explores On #COWBOYCARTER 🇨🇱

BEYONCE’S COWBOY CARTER COUNTRY! 🇨🇱 

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Beyond Country: All The Genres Beyoncé Explores On ‘Cowboy Carter’

On ‘COWBOY CARTER,’ Beyoncé is free. Her eighth studio album is an unbridled exploration of musical genres — from country to opera and R&B — that celebrates the fluidity of music and her Texas roots.

“Genres are a funny little concept, aren’t they? In theory, they have a simple definition that’s easy to understand. But in practice, well, some may feel confined.”

With those words, spoken on “SPAGHETTII” by Linda Martell— the first commercially successful Black female artist in country music and the first to play the Grand Ole Opry solo — Beyonce provides a proxy response to her original call on Instagram 10 days before COWBOY CARTER was released: “This ain’t a Country album. This is a “Beyoncé” album.”

She delivered on that promise with intent. Through a mix of homage and innovation, Beyoncé’s latest is a 27-track testament to her boundless musicality and draws  from a rich aural palette. In addition to its country leanings, COWBOY CARTER includes everything from the soulful depths of gospel to the intricate layers of opera.

Beyoncé’s stance is clear: she’s not here to fit into a box. From the heartfelt tribute in “BLACKBIIRD” to the genre-blurring tracks like “YA YA,” Beyoncé uses her platform to elevate the conversation around genre, culture, and history. She doesn’t claim country music; she illuminates its roots and wings, celebrating the Black artists who’ve shaped its essence.

The collective album proves no genre was created or remains in isolation. It’s a concept stoked in the words of the opening track, “AMERIICAN REQUIEM” when Beyonce reflects, “Nothing really ends / For things to stay the same they have to change again.” For country, and all popular genres of music to exist they have to evolve. No sound ever stays the same.

COWBOY CARTER’s narrative arc, from “AMERICAN REQUIEM” to “AMEN,” is a journey through American music’s heart and soul, paying tribute to its origins while charting a path forward. This album isn’t just an exploration of musical heritage; it’s an act of freedom and a declaration of the multifaceted influence of Black culture on American pop culture.

Here’s a closer look at some of some of the musical genres touched on in act ii, the second release of an anticipated trilogy by Beyoncé, the most GRAMMY-winning artist of all-time:

Country

Before COWBOY CARTER was even released, Beyoncé sparked critical discussion over the role of herself and all Black artists in country music. Yet COWBOY CARTER doesn’t stake a claim on country music. Rather, it spotlights the genre through collaborations with legends and modern icons, while championing the message that country music, like all popular American music and culture, has always been built on the labor and love of Black lives.

It’s a reckoning acknowledged not only by Beyoncé’s personal connection to country music growing up in Texas, but the role Black artists have played in country music rooted in gospel, blues, and folk music.

Beyoncé holds space for others, using the power of her star to shine a light on those around her. These inclusions rebuke nay-sayers who quipped pre-release that she was stealing attention from other Black country artists. It also flies in the faces that shunned and discriminated against her, serving as an example of how to do better. The reality that Beyoncé wasn’t stealing a spotlight, but building a stage for fellow artists, is a case study in how success for one begets success for others.

Gospel, Blues, & Folk (American Roots)

As is Beyoncé’s way, she mounts a case for country music with evidence to back up her testimony. She meanders a course through a sequence of styles that serve as the genre’s foundation: gospel, blues, and folk music.

“AMERIICAN REQUIEM” and “AMEN” bookend the album with gospel-inspired lyrics and choir vocals. The opener sets up a reflective sermon buoyed by  the sounds of a reverberating church organ, while the closer, with its introspective lyrics, pleads for mercy and redemption. The main verse on “AMEN”, “This house was built with blood and bone/ The statues they made were beautiful/ But they were lies of stone,” is complemented by a blend of piano, and choral harmonies.

Hymnal references are interlaced throughout the album, particularly in songs like “II HANDS II HEAVEN” and in the lyrical nuances on “JUST FOR FUN.” In the later track, Beyoncé’s voice soars with gratitude in a powerful delivery of the lines, “Time heals everything / I don’t need anything / Hallelujah, I pray to her.”

The gospel-inspired, blues-based “16 CARRIAGES” reflects the rich history of country songs borrowing from the blues while simultaneously calling back to songs sung by field laborers in the colonial American South. “Sixteen dollars, workin’ all day/ Ain’t got time to waste, I got art to make” serves as the exhausted plea of an artist working tirelessly long hours in dedication to a better life.

Rhiannon Giddens, a celebrated musician-scholar, two-time GRAMMY winner, and Pulitzer Prize recipient, infuses “TEXAS HOLD ‘EM” with her profound understanding of American folk, country, and blues. She plays the viola and banjo, the latter tracing its origins to Sub-Saharan West Africa and the lutes of ancient Egypt. Through her skilled plucking and bending of the strings, Giddens bridges the rich musical heritage of Africa and the South with the soul of country, blues, and folk music.

More Beyonce here: bit.ly/3xohNuc

Article by NINA FRAZIERGRAMMYS/APR 2024